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5 steps to creating frustration-free Android test devices

How to setup devices so that manual testing doesn’t crush your soul


2016-09-02


A few days ago, I picked up one of my test devices to try out some new code. I couldn’t believe how frustrating it was.

I wasn’t logged into the right accounts. I didn’t have the right apps installed. By the time I finished testing, I couldn’t even remember how to reproduce the bug.

And like any Android programmer, my testing frustration was magnified because we support numerous OS versions/devices.

To save my sanity, I built a system for a unified, predictable setup on every device. Here’s how to do it.

1. Install the OS versions you support

Depending on what API levels you support, ideally you have a 1–1 device to API ratio. This isn’t always possible of course, but it’s helpful.

So first things first — take an inventory of your devices and which ones support which OS versions. Then examine what your customers use the most and optimize for those scenarios.

With that in mind, my lineup looks like this right now:

(I admittedly don’t have a 4.4 device, and rely on a Genymotion VM to test for that. I’ve debated knocking down my Nexus 6P down to 6.x, and flashing a Nexus 5 to 4.4).

2. Install and configure a common set of testing apps

You’ve probably got a common set of apps you rely on to test your app. This is the time to make sure they’re all installed, logged in, and preferences tweaked to your liking.

App choices will vary person to person, but here are a few that I rely on and recommend:

3. Login everywhere

It sounds painfully obvious, but with so many devices floating around, you might not actually be logged in everywhere you need to be. Inventory your standard places to login and do it.

Typically for me this means logging in to just a handful of places:

It’s basic but there’s nothing more annoying than getting into your testing and realizing halfway through you’re not logged in to the right accounts.

4. Use Nova Launcher for a consistent experience

This was the real game changer for me. Using Nova Launcher, you can make every device look and work the same.

For me the biggest irritation was the launcher/app organization being different on every device. Everything was hard to find and it slowed me down.

Nova solves all of this.

You can setup your home screen, dock, and app drawer once, then share that across devices. When you pick up another device, your apps are in the exact same place as you expect. It’s predictable and fast— no hunting, no mental overhead.

Here’s how to do it.

The long-term beauty of using Nova is that as your apps or preferences change, just upload a new backup and restore it on all your other devices. You’re all set again!

5. Tweak all your system settings

The last thing to do is go through all your system preferences and get them working the same on each device. For me that means:

Optional: live with it

One thing I like to do is swap devices from time to time and “live” with our app for a day or two on that device.

Using the app on a real device under real scenarios gives valuable perspective. You can tell if everything looks, feels, and performs as you’d expect.

To make this process easier, a couple tips:

That’s it, I’m glad you made it this far! Following these steps should help reduce your manual testing frustrations, and hopefully keep you in the zone doing the more fun stuff (like programming everything that needs to be tested!)